Cider Poached pears with spices and toasted almonds

At the July residential yoga weekend, I wanted a dessert that would be light, yet full of flavour and would round off a fairly substantial meal without leaving guests with that “heavy” feeling. This was a huge hit, and I’m delighted that this recipe will be featured in the December issue of Bee Green Magazine, but just for subscribers. In the meantime, here’s a sneaky peek:

This is such an easy recipe to make. It would be a lovely way to end a meal with friends and it doubles (or triples!) up easily too. The orchard on the farm is full of pears, plums and apples right now, and I can’t wait to make the most of the season’s bounty at our next Yoga weekend in October. There are still places left, so if a weekend of yoga and delicious food in the depths of the Dorset countryside sound good, do get in touch.

Ingredients (serves 4)
4 firm ripe pears (Conference pears work well)
500ml bottle cider (medium/dry)
50g demerara OR golden granulated/caster sugar OR Honey/Maple Syrup/Agave
1 cinnamon stick or 1tsp ground cinnamon
6 cardamom pods (swap for cloves, all spice or ground nutmeg for a more “festive” vibe)
1-2 tsp pink peppercorns
60g toasted, flaked almonds
Extra thick cream, greek yogurt or coconut yogurt, to serve.

Method
Peel the pears, leaving the stalks on and set aside. Place the cider, sugar and spices into a large saucepan with a lid, give it a good stir, then place the pears in and put the lid on. Simmer over a medium heat for around 20-30 minutes, or until a round bladed knife passes easily through the thickest part of the pear. Carefully, remove the pears from the poaching liquid using a slotted spoon, set aside and keep warm. Turn the heat up under the poaching liquid, and with the lid off, reduce until thickened and syrupy. Remove the cardamom pods and the cinnamon stick but keep the peppercorns in. Put the pears into individual serving dishes, spoon over the syrup and sprinkle with toasted almonds then serve with a dollop of cream or your favourite yogurt or dairy-free alternative on the side.

 

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Creamy Porcini Mushroom Pasta

Last week we tried out our pasta machine (purchased from a charity shop over a year ago) for the first time, and made buckwheat pasta. It was a great success, and it was much easier than I thought it would be. We used two eggs, buckwheat flour and a little bit of water, then rolled it through the pasta machine in the usual way. After this, we left it to dry for about 5 mins, then rolled again through the spaghetti cutter, and blanched in boiling salted water for maybe 5-6 minutes. Then we rinsed it in cold water and drizzled olive oil over it and set aside to be heated in the pasta sauce, which I will get onto now. You can obviously just use normal dried pasta, as you probably have better things to do, especially on a weeknight. Also shop-bought dried egg-free pasta makes the dish vegan.

I’m not vegan, but I don’t eat meat or dairy, and I can’t eat wheat. I had been eating a lot of shirataki noodles and pasta, in order to keep my carb intake down, but because they come shrink-wrapped in plastic, we have decided to stop buying them and try to also reduce our plastic consumption. This sauce idea came to me after craving a creamy-tasting risotto. I thought I would experiment with trying to create a vegan version of a rich, Italian dish.

Ingredients:

Dried Porcini Mushrooms (I got these from Lidl), soaked in hot water for 40 mins

Chestnut Mushrooms, sliced

One Onion, finely chopped

Three garlic cloves, finely chopped

Freshly ground black pepper

Sea Salt

Olive Oil (or similar)

Splash of White Wine (optional)

The Mushroom Water (from the dried mushrooms)

200ml (ish) unsweetened Soya Milk

2 Tablespoons of Vegan Protein Powder

One Teaspoon of Gluten Free Flour (or similar)

 

Method:

Gently fry the onions until they are soft, and then add the garlic and fry for a further 3 minutes. Cook them on a medium heat and make sure you don’t let the garlic catch or burn. Once they have softened, remove them from the pan and put them to one side.

Using the same pan, fry the chestnut mushrooms in a little more oil or vegan butter, with the salt and pepper (to taste) until they have a nice golden brown colour to them. Set these aside with the onion and garlic while you prepare the rest of the sauce.

In a jug, mix together the soya milk, protein powder, flour, white wine and some of mushroom water (about 100ml but make sure it’s not hot). Beat the mixture until it’ is smooth with no lumps, then heat the mixture in the frying pan and whisk it gently as it heats. It should start to thicken into a creamy-looking sauce. Once it has started to thicken, add in the cooked mushrooms, the softened porcini mushrooms, and the onion and garlic mixture, and continue to heat the sauce. Once you are happy with the texture (it will continue to thicken the more you heat it) then you can remove it from the heat and stir in the cooked pasta. Allow the pasta to heat up in the sauce before you serve it, and be sure to check the seasoning.

Serve on warm plates, with freshly chopped basil, more black pepper and truffle oil for extra flavour and richness.

 

HDB xx

 

Hannah & Hayley’s FAQ

How long has Lovegrove Essentials been up and running, and why did you decide to set up the business?

HDB: The brand had been an idea we had discussed for a number of years, but the company as you see it now is about 3 years old. We wanted to create a beautiful range of skincare that harnessed the natural therapeutic properties of essential oils, but still looked stunning and felt luxurious to use. Something that would sit alongside the big-dogs of skincare quite easily.

HML: After many years as a body and facial therapist, I wanted to create a range of natural products for professional therapists to use, products that support the body’s own capability for healing and regeneration.

 

Why did you decide to focus on luxury and natural products?

HDB: For me, having worked with many luxury brands, I felt there was a huge gap between luxury and natural. So many luxury customers associate natural with something not “backed by science” and that might not work as well as a more chemical-based product, and that’s simply not the case with Lovegrove Essentials. I think we fill this gap.

HML: I agree – I have seen much better results on the skin from naturally active ingredients, and of course their aromas can benefit the psyche through the olfactory system.

What was the first product you made and how did you set about selling it?

HDB: The initial selection of products we had made was huge! Such a big range. We actually didn’t sell any of these, but mum used them for her treatments.

HML: I think the first were the massage balms and an after-wax soothing lotion.

 

How did the range of products grow from there?

HDB: We looked at each product and worked out which ones we liked best. I wanted to start with a much smaller range, like a ‘core-line’ and expand from there.

HML: We realised that we were both happily using the same four key products, but because of the difference in our age and our skin, we were using them in slightly different ways. This proved to us that the intelligent use of good-quality natural ingredients is the key to long-term skin care.

 

Why did you also decide to produce a professional range? What’s the difference between this and your main line of products?

HDB: Hannah? I think this is your area of expertise!

HML: The key products are the same, but there are therapeutic techniques that I incorporate into my treatments, and active natural ingredients that you can’t produce and sell in a pot because they have to be used immediately, things like strawberries, cucumber, papaya and oatmeal.

 

Do you actually make the products yourselves? Where are the products made and packaged?

HDB: Yes – we actually make the products ourselves. We have a small team to help with manufacture, and everything is made at our HQ in Thorncombe. We have a production lab which has been hygiene and safety checked where we make and package everything.

HML: We’re very particular about quality and like to check each product before it goes out. We can also keep an eye on each batch of ingredients, which being naturally produced can vary in smell or colour.

 

Are you constantly coming up with new ideas for products?

HDB: I definitely am, I love blending new things and trying them on myself. I love finding a new ingredient and working out how we might incorporate it into our next product. We try to listen to our customers when it comes to New Product Development.

HML: It’s perhaps not obvious how much has to go into product development, the rules and regulations involved in getting it formally certified and onto the shelves. But we enjoy the trial and error, refining the texture and smell to get just the right effect for the whole body.

 

What has been your best-selling/signature product and why?

HDB: It’s difficult to say – perhaps the Cleansing Balm or the Moisture Cream. They are the two best-selling individual products. Also the Mini Essentials is great, our starter kit.

HML: Yes, certainly the Cleansing Balm, but people beginning to realise how fabulous the Moisture Cream is too!

 

How has it been working as a mother/daughter team? Do you have the same visions or is there sometimes a clash?!

HDB: Hahaha! Well, of course its been hard. Our relationship is very strong, luckily, so we always work things out eventually. My main thing is to be really vigilant about separating work and play, as otherwise we just end up talking business all the time and we forget to have fun as mum and daughter.

HML: And I missed her so much when she was up in London! I’m really pleased we can finally work together now, instead of at a distance.

 

What’s next for Lovegrove Essentials?

HDB: Lots more events next year, and new product launches. We will be bringing out our fabulous Aromatic Face Mask as a retail product, after some amazing feedback from our most recent round of user surveys.

HML: And I’m refining the body massage and facial treatment courses for therapists, and of course running the Yoga and Wellness Retreats.

 

Anything else you particularly want to mention?

HDB: We are looking for super-star therapists, massage therapists, boutiques and salons that might like to offer our treatments or retail range as of 2018. If this is you, or if you know of anyone who might be interested, send an email to info@lovegroveessenials.com

 

Hayley’s Oat Bran Bread

IMG_2873-1As a wheat-free foodie, I love this ‘bread’ and I make this probably twice a week. It’s become a big part of our diet, which is really saying something when you live the man who literally wrote the book on bread! What Daniel Stevens doesn’t know about baking isn’t worth knowing, so the fact that he’s adopted this recipe into his repertoire is a pretty big deal for me. It’s super high protein and wheat free, packed with fibre and can be topped with sweet or savoury things. It has a dense texture, similar to rye or pumpernickel bread, and also makes great crostini or bruschetta.

Ingredients:

200g Oat Bran (you can get this in most supermarkets now, in the cereal aisle, or Holland & Barrett do a fine cut one which is my favourite)

2-3 Eggs, or vegan equivalent

2 Tablespoons of Greek Yoghurt or vegan equivalent

Pinch of sea salt

Baking Powder

1 Table spoon of Olive Oil (or similar)

Seeds, nuts or dried berries (optional)

Method:

Pre-Heat your oven to about 180*C and line a tin with baking paper. I usually use a round 8 inch cake tin, and line the bottom with a circle of baking parchment.

Use two large or three medium eggs, egg replacer or aqua faba (chick pea or bean water) of an equivalent amount and beat with a fork or whisk.

Add the oat bran in table spoons, starting with about six. Keep adding until you have a thick paste.

Then add the greek yoghurt, or vegan alternative (almond or Soya milk is fine) and mix in, loosening the paste. Beat in half a teaspoon of baking powder at this stage also, and add some salt and a drizzle of olive oil.

Once you have the basic mixture, you can add seeds (I use sunflower, linseeds and pumpkin seeds), nuts or dried berries to create different flavours of bread. Goji berries would work really nicely and would add a delicious sweetness.

Once you’ve added your extras, scrape the mix into your baking tin. You can add more seeds to decorate the top before you pop it in the oven if you like.

Bake at 180*C for about 30 mins. I have yet to burn a loaf of this bread – it seems you can cook it for quite some time before it even begins to colour! You may a get a little rise from the baking powder and eggs, but not much.

Check after 20 mins and see if you want the top to colour more. Once it’s golden brown, remove it from the oven and tip the bread out onto a wire rack to cool. It doesn’t slice very well when it’s still warm, so you’ll have to be patient before you try it!

 

Top with organic grass-fed butter or avocados and tomato salsa, smoked salmon, peanut butter and homemade jam, marmalade… The list is endless!! I’ve yet to find something it doesn’t go with 😀

 

Hayley x

Green Energy Juice

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After a long week of New Year celebrations, Daniel and I were keen to get ahead on 2018 and do a full de-clutter of the house – re-arranging furniture, hoovering behind things and taking stuff to the charity shop. I had a horrible cold, and we had both over indulged at Daniel’s dad’s house earlier in the week. Needless to say – we were both feeling pretty tired and needed a serious energy boost to get the productive weekend we had in mind off to a good start. Enter my Green Energy Juice. Packed with nutritious dark green plants (full of mood lifting B-Vits) and metabolism-boosting spices, this high-protein juice delivered the kick-up-the-butt that our minds, bodies and digestive systems needed.

Ingredients:

300ml pressed Clementine Juice (can use orange or another fruit. Pineapple is great too.)

Half a cucumber, chopped into chunks (organic if possible)

Kale (I love the frozen balls you can get in supermarkets these days)

Ginger (fresh or frozen into cubes)

Large pinch of Black pepper (freshly ground)

1 whole Red chilli (optional)

2 Tablespoons of vegan protein powder (I use Pulsin Protein)

2 Teaspoons of Powdered Spirulina

Pour the juice into a high-performance juice blender (NOT a juicer as it removes too much of the nutritious fibre from the veggies).

Add the veg and spices, and a few cubes of ice if you like it really cold. Blend the whole lot for about 30 seconds. This makes enough for two people, so share between two glasses and feel the instant benefits of this delicious juice.

Don’t forget to share your juice with us! Tags us in your pics on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter and help spread the juicy love ❤

Vegan Stuffing Balls – a cool yule canapé!

Got vegan guests coming and don’t know what to serve as a snack? Try these stuffing balls – no one will be complaining, even the carnivores! My recipe is inspired by Green Goddess Mel Wells’ stuffing, and I have cooked it for the past few years for my boyfriend’s nieces, one of whom is veggie and the other has serious allergies to gluten, eggs and dairy.
Ingredients:sous-vide-quiona-finishing-steps-image-0
750ml good quality vegetable stock
3 sticks of celery, finely chopped
3 garlic cloves, puréed
1 large white onion, diced
1 red onion, diced
fresh herbs – oregano, thyme, sage
good quality sea salt
225g chopped mushrooms
About half a loaf of gluten-free bread, crumbed
1 cup Quinoa
Some nuts or seeds
1/2 cup dried cranberries or prunes
2 finely chopped apples
NOTE – for a lower-carb option you could replace some of the breadcrumbs with oat bran.
Method:
Rinse the quinoa and cook it to the instructions on the packet. This usually takes about 15-20 mins.
Whilst the quinoa is cooking, using a large frying pan, gently fry the onions and celery in a little oil until they are soft and starting to colour, but don’t let them catch in the pan. Once they have softened, add the garlic for a few minutes and then the mushrooms and herbs, and continue to cook all the veggies for another 10 minutes on a low heat.
Once all the veg has softened, take a big mixing bowl and mix together the veg, quinoa, breadcrumbs, and the rest of the ingredients, adding the stock a little at a time. It should form a thick, sticky mixture that you can roll into bite-sized balls. Don’t worry if the mix is a bit loose – as long as they will form a roundish shape, it’s totally fine.
Place the stuffing balls onto a baking sheet and cook in a hot oven (around 200*c) for 10-12 mins. You don’t want them to be too dry, but slightly crips on the outside. The other option is to pop into a ceramic baking dish and then slice it up after its baked.

DSC_0060They can be served hot with mushroom gravy (for the vegan guests) or go against the grain (sorry – couldn’t help myself!) and wrap them in bacon and serve with a meaty gravy. They’re also really tasty with a cranberry jelly dip 🙂

 Merry Christmas – Love Hayley x

Hannah’s low carb biscuit bars

These very low carb/high protein snack bars are fantastic for that moment when you would reach for cake/biscuit/chocolate – something with your hot drink to keep you going until lunch or dinner time.
Cinnamon is amazing – it contains compounds that promote insulin function, improve blood glucose levels and increase insulin sensitivity, so it’s very helpful when you’re feeling hungry. It also slows down the speed at which food is digested so it lowers the ‘glycaemic load’ of your food. You might want to play with the amount, to suit your taste.

 

In a bowl, mix:

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100g oat bran

15g goji berries

25g chopped nuts

25g flaked almonds

15g ground almonds

A tsp cinnamon

 

Whisk together:

1 egg (or 50ml chick pea water)

1tbsp water

1 tbsp Xylitol (e.g. Natural Sweet)

Half a tsp of vanilla essence

Combine the ingredients and press into a 7” square cake tine, lined with parchment. Score into 9 squares. You could use a small, round sandwich tin and score into triangles. Bake in a fairly hot over for 15 minutes. Turn out, peel off the paper and gently separate the pieces before you allow to cool. Keeps well in an airtight container.